Colorado Probate Blog - Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, P.C.

Aretha Franklin's Funky Wills

In May, three hand-written wills were found hidden in Aretha Franklin’s Detroit area home. Her family and lawyers previously thought she had died intestate. Two hand-written wills dated 2010 were found in a locked cabinet and third hand-written will dated 2014 was found under a couch in Ms. Franklin’s living room. The wills are difficult to follow. (Click here for example.) All three documents have been offered for probate as valid holographic wills. There is some question whether they are valid under Michigan law.

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51 Hits

Annual Review Checklist

January is the perfect time for the annual review of estate plans, particularly if you have had significant changes in your life such as deaths, relationships or assets. Here are a few questions to help get started.

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117 Hits

Swedish Death Cleaning

A common problem which many families encounter following the death of a parent or other relative is how to deal with the decedent’s personal property. In the absence of a legally effective personal property memorandum, will, or other governing document signed by the decedent specifying who gets what, the disposition of the personal property sometimes leads to bitter, protracted, and often times expensive controversies between the surviving spouse, children of the first or subsequent marriages, or other family members.

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483 Hits

Elusive Assets After Death

Aubrey McClendon, a co-founder of Chesapeak Energy Corp. and a pioneer in the shale industry, died on March 2, 2016. Mr. McClendon had significant assets yet his estate appears to be insolvent. Creditor claims filed to date exceed $1.1 billion. Mr. McClendon’s business holdings were complex and the estate has had a hard time selling assets.

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855 Hits

Estate of Petteys v. Farmers State Bank of Brush, 2016 COA 34, No. 14CA1581

On March 10, 2016, the Colorado Court of Appeals issued an opinion that reversed the trial court and held that an irrevocable trust, a part of which was included in the gross estate of the decedent, was required to contribute its pro rata share of estate taxes under Colorado's estate tax apportionment statute. Our firm had prepared the Will for the decedent, in which estate taxes attributable to the irrevocable trust's inclusion in his gross estate were specifically apportioned to that trust. The trust had been created in 1958. The decedent died in 2009; a U.S. Estate Tax Return was filed in 2010, the estate paid the entire tax due, and the personal representative requested that the trust contribute its share of the tax. When the trustee refused, the personal representative brought suit. Initially, the trial court held that because federal law was silent as to apportionment to such interests prior to the 1986 effective date for IRC 2207B, the Colorado statute at 15-12-916 applied, but the court did not decide certain other issues. After the IRS completed its audit in October 2012, final request for contribution was made. A hearing was held before the trial court in 2015 on the remaining issues, and the court ordered, among other things, that the effective date statute at 15-17-101 permitted the court to refuse to apply the Colorado Probate Code if it found it to be "inequitable." The trial court found that it would be inequitable to force the trustee to pay its pro rata share of the tax and entered judgment for the trustee. The personal representative appealed.

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909 Hits

Digital Asset List

Many of our clients have requested a means for recording and recalling the numerous user names, passwords and on-line account information that go hand-in-hand with living in a digital age. Please access our Digital Asset List for a comprehensive information gathering tool to collect your increasingly important information, which is vital to your agents and personal representatives in the event of your incapacity or your death. As with all such information, it should be stored in a safe place which is identified to your agents and personal representatives.

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1683 Hits